Keeping a Record

You know, when I take a moment to sit down and think about things, and this Mountainstroh Blog in particular, it still surprises me that it is still going.  It’s been over 2 years since I’ve started (with a swift kick from Michelle to make it happen), and even though it’s not a daily occurrence any more (hell even I have only so much to say) it is still multiple times a week.

I am surprised because even though I have tried over the years, keeping a regular journal just never worked for me.  I wasn’t that disciplined and I hate hand writing anything. (Dates back to many an elementary report card that said “Great student, smart as hell, a wiz at math, but his handwriting is atrocious!)

Even trying to type one hasn’t worked.  I am what we like to refer to as someone who is “Journal Challenged.” Which means only this blog will serve as a record of what I have done.

In all honesty, again when I spare the brain cell energy to ponder this, I am a bit concerned about that.  Back in my day, before the interwebs, I took a helluva lot of pictures in the college days.  These were taken to the Quickie Mart (or whatever facsimile I had in Pullman) and sent out to be developed.  If I had money I could spare from beer purchases, I chose the one hour place, otherwise it was a week later. (It was always fun to find that roll of film that you had NO idea of the contents!

Once developed, they were placed in a huge photo album.  I still have this and I am now called (at least in my head) the Keeper of the Archives!  Every now and then I will pull out a picture no one remembers, just to get the reactions.

Nowadays things are different.  Photos are shared on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter or just kept on the phone.  When is the last time you printed a picture.  My question: How long will these applications be around.  And if Facebook or twitter goes, where will you find (If you can find) that shot of you and Aunt Gert at craps table in Caesar’s Palace? (I can never find Aunt Girt’s pics cuz I suck at documenting and naming pictures) How many times to you hear, “My (insert electronic device here) was stolen and it had ALL my pictures of…..”

The same can be said about the Mountainstroh blog.  How long will WordPress be here?  What if I get tired of them and go somewhere else?  What is they just disappear into the ether never to be seen again.  All the time and energy that went into each post (and I do try hard to make each one as good as can be (No really I do!  Even with typos!)) would be gone forever.

I’ve thought about printing each one, but lord that would take of reams of paper and then I’d have notebook clutter around the house.  How will I remember things when I get older and I am forcing the grandkids to listen for the umpteenth time about my ride from Cannon Beach to Lincoln City when I ran out of water!

Well in this one area, Journal Challenged Valente is a little less useless at recording his exploits.  Way back when I started to ride, I saw on-line an ad for “Recycled Journal’s constructed by Tibetan Sherpas.” I had to have one!

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I have no idea if this has ever been touched by a Sherpa, but I like it a lot and it’s just as rustic on the inside (plus you can see my handwriting.

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In this book has a record of most of  the BIG rides I’ve ever done.  My first STP somehow never made it into the book but each day of the Oregon Coast is captured, along with the miles traveled. The RSVP, and High Pass Challenge as well as multiple Chilly Hillys.  The one day STPs and Crater Lake Century.

In addition there are some “night before jitters” captured as well.  For one, the night before the High Pass Challenge, I wrote “I am pretty sure I will finish the course, but there is no way I will get done in under 10 hours for a medal.”  And, who can forget the night before my first one day STP “Its Pucker time people!”

The downside on the journal is I am not all that punctual.  It might be MONTHS after the ride before I capture what happened.  Sometimes I have even had to refer to the next day blog post to refresh my memory.  (This year though I have been pretty good, got the wet McClinchy Mile and my recent crash and burn already captured).

Just this week, I broke it out to tell Michelle about a tiny town on the Oregon Coast called Port Ordford.  I slept in a dive hotel but the restaurant across the street was beyond fancy and yummy!  Of course I didn’t capture the name of the place.  However, I did capture meeting people whose dachshund  just had 4 puppies in the Winnebago!  I had forgotten that and 7 years later it still makes me gp “Aweeeeeeeee”

Now I know I could lose this.  Or in a fit of cleaning and decluttering toss it.  But barring that, I will have a pretty complete record of what I have done over the years.  Could be no one but Michelle or I will ever care.  But maybe, somewhere down the road, there will be a reincarnation of my kid sis who DOES care about the family tree, and what adventures were done.  Maybe this will help her out!

Or maybe, when I look like this

 

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I can put on my specs and read about my younger self and all he has done and say, “DAMN!  I was pretty darn good back then!”

Now to figure out what to do with the pictures….

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6 Responses to Keeping a Record

  1. sarburch says:

    You raise a good point about the longevity of blogs, as well as written journals. I’ve often pondered the same thoughts.
    Should any of the blogging websites go defunct, I would like to think we’d have enough of a heads-up to copy the posts elsewhere.
    As for the hand-written journals, you could consider digitizing them. Personally, though, I like the experience of flipping through *real* pages filled with *real* handwriting.

  2. We worked as volunteers when some Bosnian refugees came over during the recent conflict. The men had mostly been in the Serbian concentration camps. One of the things all of the families brought was their photos.

  3. Writing down your thoughts and experiences, then reviewing the posts, will help keep your brain cells from dying.

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